Reformed Programme of Undergraduate Studies 2020 and Onward

REFORMED PROGRAMME OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 2020-21 AND ONWARD

The Reformed Programme of Undergraduate Studies (RPUS) for the School of History and Archaeology (School's General Assembly Decision 421/12.3.2020) will go into effect starting in academic year 2020-21. The RPUS follows the basic principles and general guidelines of the OPUS.

Programme Structure / Course Types

The RPUS includes 42 courses in 6 categories:

  • Compulsory courses (C). This category includes 10 general core courses equivalent to 50 ECTS, and 2 compulsory courses in Ancient Greek Philology (2X5=10 ECTS) with an emphasis on language practice. These courses are compulsory for all students and are distributed between the first 2 semesters of studies.
  • Compulsory courses per module (CM), 12 courses (12x6=72 ECTS) per module
  • Compulsory seminars per module (CMS), 2 courses (2x7=14 ECTS) per module
  • Compulsory courses per module of Thematic Area (CM), 2 courses (2x7=14 ECTS) per module
  • Optional courses (O), 4 (4x6=24 ECTS) from the selected specialisation; 2 (2x6=12 ECTS) from the other specialisation; 4 optional courses from the School of Philology from the available course codes in Latin, Ancient Greek, Medieval and Modern Greek Philology (4x5=20 ECTS); and 3 optional courses from the Pedagogical and Teaching Competence course pool (3x6=18 ECTS).
  • Free options (FO), 1 (6 ECTS) from either the same School or from other Schools of the Faculty or University.

Description of Courses

1. Introductory courses are divided between the 1st and 2nd semesters of studies. Of these, 8 are indicated as “Introduction to...”. For History, the syllabi of these courses cover the following units: Defining the subject area, presentation of sources, methodology, approach and history of research, contribution of auxiliary sciences, trends and prospects in research, definition of geographical and chronological framework, conceptual tools, distinguishing the separate periods and presenting their key characteristics with emphasis on the political, social and economic sectors. In Archaeology, the introductory courses aim to present the various categories of tangible remnants of cultural periods and the interpretative approaches associated with them. The courses in this category are not available to students from other Schools. There are 2 introductory courses to the science of History (theoretical problems, development of historiography from antiquity through postmodernism), and the science of Archaeology (history of research, theoretical springboards, interpretive approaches, analytical methods), respectively. The 2 courses in Ancient Greek Philology aim at familiarising students with historiographic texts through the necessary language exercises.

2. Courses designated as “Compulsory courses per module” (12x6=72 ECTS) are selected from respective pools of courses in history or archaeology/art which are developed for the specialisations by the respective Departments. In terms of content, they cover either individual chronological periods within the scientific fields or broader thematic areas or even sub-disciplines of the specialisations. These courses are available to students from other Schools.

3. Compulsory seminars per module (CMS) function as courses for a limited audience (up to 25 persons) and are mandatory. They aim at (a) familiarising students with the sources and methodology of research in the respective fields; (b) presenting scientific approaches to managing special topics (analysis and synthesis) within the individual subject areas, and ultimately at preparing written papers; (c) familiarising students with methods of preparing and presenting an Issue in Learning and Teaching, falling in the category of CPTC courses. The CMS courses scheduling includes student visits to off-campus sites (museums, archives, galleries, libraries, research centres, excavations and others). CMS may be led by Laboratory Teaching Staff, under an instructor's supervision as part of legal teaching obligations. A paper written to particular specifications for each specialisation is mandatory. Students select 2 CMS courses: for History specialisation, 1 from each Department, and for Archaeology and History of Art specialisation, 2 with a different subject area code. Students who fail a CMS course must register and take it again.

4. The Thematic Areas include courses with broader syllabi (bibliography) and are selected from 1 of 2 pools (History or Archaeology and History of Art) which the Departments draw up by year. These courses correspond to the subject categories of the Departments in each specialisation. These courses are not mandatory. Depending on the size of the audience, the instructor may assign obligatory papers for extra credit of 30%. This extra credit assumes that a passing grade was earned on an oral or written examination. These courses are not available to students from other Schools.

5. Optional courses (O) are drawn from pools of courses offered each year by the Departments. Such courses are topical approaches to the individual subject areas divided into the following categories: 1) Courses which are part of the student’s specialisation; 2) Courses which belong to the other specialisation; 3) Courses offered within the School; 4) Courses linked to obtaining a Certificate for Pedagogical and Teaching Competence (CPTC). The latter are common to both specialisations and are selected from the “Issues in Education” pool (2 courses) and “Teaching for Special Purposes and Teaching Practice” (1 course). Note: Optional specialisation courses which, due to the way they are taught, are intended to follow a seminar format are held with a specified number of students of no more than 25. The courses include, amongst others, either student practice in the study of the material or external visits.

6. Free options (FO) are courses that students select based on their own personal preferences from other Schools of the same Faculty or other Faculties of the University.

Summary Table of Courses

COURSE TYPE NUMBER OF COURSES ECTS
Compulsory course

10
+
2 courses of Ancient Greek Language (Exercises)

50
+
10

Compulsory course per module 12 72
Compulsory seminar per module 2 14
Compulsory course per module of Thematic Area 2 14
Optional course

4 courses from the selected specialisation
2 courses from the other specialisation
4 courses offered by the School of Philology
3 CPTC courses 

24
12
20
18

Free option 1 6
Total 42 240

Sign-off Procedure

1. Course registration takes place at the start of each semester on the dates posted on the School website.Registration takes place online through the AUTh eUniversity Services. Students who miss the registration deadline for the courses they wish to take will not be able to sit exams for those courses.

2. For each semester under the RPUS, students register for new courses to take, up to an equivalent of 30 ECTS.

The procedure to register for courses is as follows:

  • 1st semester students are automatically registered for 1st semester core courses with their post-admission registration.
  • 2nd semester students register for all core courses in the respective semester.
  • 3rd semester students select their specialisation before registering for courses. They then register for the compulsory courses offered in the semester of studies of their chosen specialisation.
  • 4th semester students register for all compulsory courses per module offered in the respective semester.
  • 5th semester students register for 1 compulsory course per module (CM), 1 compulsory seminar per module (CMS), 1 optional course (O), 1 CPTC course (from the Issues in Education category) and 1 course from the School of Philology.
  • 6th semester students register for 1 compulsory course per module (CM), 1 compulsory seminar per module (CMS), one optional course (O), 1 CPTC course (from the Teaching for Special Purposes and Teaching Practice category) and 1 course from the School of Philology.
  • 7th semester students register for 1 Thematic Area, 2 optional courses (O), 1 optional course (O) or compulsory course per module (CM) from the other specialisation and 1 course from the School of Philology.
  • 8th semester students register for 1 Thematic Area, 1 optional course (O), 1 optional course (O) or compulsory course per module (CM) from the other specialisation, 1 course from the School of Philology and one free option (FO) from any other School they choose.

3. As there is a maximum number of 25 students who can take part in CMS and Seminars, students should register for these courses in writing, firstly with the instructors or the Department Secretariats and then online. Both registrations are required.

4. Students may be exempted from CPTC courses which are common to both specialisations only by submitting a reasoned request. An exemption means the student will not receive a CPTC. Students whose requests are approved will cover these courses (except CMS) with optional courses (O) from their selected specialisation.

5. A free option (FO) from other Schools may be substituted with an optional course (O) from the same or the other specialisation with an equivalent ECTS weighting or a course from the School of Philology.

6.  With regard to incomplete courses from previous semesters, note the following:

Students must register for courses from previous semesters in the semester during which they are taught, if they wish to sit the examinations for those courses. The number of incomplete courses from previous semesters that students may register for is determined as follows:

  • 3rd semester students - all incomplete courses from the 1st semester,
  • 4th semester students - all incomplete courses from the 2nd semester,
  • 5th semester students - up to 6 incomplete courses from only the 1st and 3rd semester,
  • 6th semester students - up to 6 incomplete courses from only the 2nd and 4th semester,
  • 7th semester students - up to 6 incomplete courses from the 1st, 3rd and 5th semester,
  • 8th semester students - up to 10 incomplete courses from the 2nd, 4th and 6th semester.

7. Students in their 9th semester and onward who have completed the minimum number of semesters required to receive the degree, in accordance with the indicative programme of studies, may sit exams during either the winter or spring examination period of each academic year in all courses they must still complete to receive the degree, regardless of whether these courses are taught in winter or spring semester.

8. The total number of ECTS credits required to graduate under the RPUS is 240. The degree may include up to 2 courses in excess of 240 ECTS.

9.  A change in specialisation is possible upon request submitted at the start of the 3rd or 4th semester of studies.

Certificate for Pedagogical and Teaching Competence

A degree from the School of History and Archaeology provides its graduates with a Certificate for Pedagogical and Teaching Competence (CPTC), which is required by law for appointment to teach in the Greek public secondary education system for those admitted to the School in academic year 2015-16 or later.
The CPTC is acquired automatically and at the same time as the degree, provided studies are organised as follows:

  • Students must have completed a total of 5 courses from the 5th semester onward.
  • Courses are distributed along the following Thematic Areas:

THEMATIC AREA I: Issues in Education

In accordance with their Programme of Studies, students are required to take 2 freely chosen internal courses from the 1st Thematic Area.

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE SEMESTER COURSE TYPE TEACHING HOURS ECTS
  GROUP Α        
  Optional Pedagogic Course* V-VI CPTC 1

3 h/w Χ 13 weeks = 39 h/s

6
HAN 261 Culture and Education in the Ancient World V-VI O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks = 39 h/s 6
HBY 254 Learning and Education in Byzantium V-VI O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks = 39 h/s 6

* Students may select courses within the 1st Thematic Area which are offered by the AUTh Faculty of Philosophy - School of Philosophy and Education, based on the ad hoc/annual decisions of their School's General Assembly.

The remaining courses are offered by instructors in the School of History and Archaeology.

THEMATIC AREA II: Issues in Learning and Teaching

In accordance with their Programme of Studies, students are required to take 2 courses from the 2nd Thematic Area.

  COURSE TITLE SEMESTER COURSE TYPE TEACHING HOURS ECTS
  GROUP Α        
1 Compulsory Seminar per module History V-VI CMS

3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
39h/s

6
2 Compulsory Seminar per module History V-VI CMS 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
39h/s
6
  GROUP Β        
1 Compulsory Seminar per module Archaeology/Art V-VI CMS 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
39h/s
6
2 Compulsory Seminar per module Archaeology/Art V-VI CMS 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
39h/s
6

THEMATIC AREA III: Teaching for Special Purposes and Teaching Practice

In accordance with their Programme of Studies, students are required to take 1 freely chosen internal course from the 3rd Thematic Area.

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE COURSE TYPE TEACHING HOURS ECTS
HIST 461 Didactics of History O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
39h/s
6
ARCH 352 Interpretation of the Archaeological Record. Museum and Education. Seminar O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
​​​​​​​39h/s
6
ABY / ACL / APR 351 Practice in Archaeological Sites and Museums. Seminar* O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
​​​​​​​39h/s
6
ARCH 351 Introduction to Museum Studies (Seminar) O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
​​​​​​​39h/s
6
ARCH 353 Museumpaedagogics. Seminar O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
​​​​​​​39h/s
6
HIA 262 Teaching Humanities through Art Historical Material: A Teacher Training Seminar O 3 h/w Χ 13 weeks=
​​​​​​​39h/s
6

* This course may be offered under 3 different codes (ABY, ACL, APR).

In brief:

THEMATIC AREA NUMBER OF COURSES ECTS
1. Issues in Education 2 12
2. Issues in Learning and Teaching 2 12
3. Teaching for Special Purposes and Teaching Practice 1 6
Total 5 30

  TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS

1. The RPUS goes into effect with the start of the 2020-21 academic year and replaces all prior Programmes of Undergraduate Studies. It applies to students who register with the School for the first time in this year (2020-21) and does not affect those who registered for the first time before 2020-21. Students registered prior to 2020-21 shall complete their studies in accordance with the OPUS, which was in effect the year they first registered with the School.

2. To facilitate the smooth transition from the old to the reformed PUS and to avoid problems with large numbers of students in courses or an overly heavy teaching load on instructors, the School has decided to organise its instructional programme as follows:

  • For the 2020-21 academic year, i.e. the 1st year of the RPUS being in effect:
    • Teaching of courses from the 1st year under the RPUS.
    • ​​​​​​​Teaching of all courses under the OPUS. Students registering for the 3rd and 4th semester of studies (winter and spring respectively) must first list compulsory courses (C) and compulsory courses per module (CM) under the OPUS for which they have never registered before so they can take part in examinations in subsequent academic years as well.
  • For the 2021-22 academic year, i.e. the 2nd year of the RPUS being in effect:
    • Teaching of courses from the 1st and 2nd year under the RPUS.
    • Teaching of all courses under the OPUS, except the compulsory courses (C) that students registered for in their 1st year of studies.
  • For the 2022-23 academic year, i.e. the 3rd year of the RPUS being in effect:
    • Teaching of all courses of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd year under the RPUS.
    • Teaching of all courses under the OPUS, except the compulsory courses (C) that students registered for in their 1st year of studies.
  • For the 2023-24 academic year, i.e. the fourth year of the RPUS being in effect:
    • Teaching of all courses under the OPUS for all years.

   There is additional provision that:

3. Students under the OPUS who will not have completed their studies by the 2023-24 academic year will be able to sit exams for OPUS courses until they complete their studies, in accordance with legislation in force each time.

4. Those students under the OPUS who wish to sit exams for incomplete courses from previous semesters, i.e. those they registered for and attended, will be able to register such courses using a separate online registration form at the start of each semester, in addition to the 30 ECTS of new courses they have not yet attended, as follows:

  • students in their 3rd-7th semester, up to 6 incomplete courses from all previous semesters (winter or spring), provided they are being taught during the semester of registration.
  • students in their 8th semester, up to 10 incomplete courses from all previous semesters (winter or spring), provided they are being taught during the semester of registration.

5. Students in their 9th semester and onward who have completed the minimum number of semesters required to receive the degree, in accordance with the indicative programme of studies, may sit exams during either the winter or spring examination period of each academic year in all courses they must still complete to receive the degree, regardless of whether these courses are taught in winter or spring semester.

FURTHER PROVISIONS APPLYING TO ALL STUDENTS

Students’ Internship (Partnership Agreement)

1. The School’s Internship is linked to FO AAA 312 of the OPUS (6 ECTS) and STI 151 of the RPUS (8 ECTS). The Internship Regulation is available at the School’s website. Under the OPUS, the Internship is graded, while under the RPUS it is marked “pass” or “fail”. It aims to familiarise students with the production process and their practical experience in real-world working conditions. The Internship is undertaken in the 4th year of studies or by the 10th semester at the latest. The duration of the Internship for each student is two full, consecutive months. The work at the host organisation is full-time, paid and insured, if it is arranged by the Internship Programme through a Partnership Agreement.

2. The criteria for selecting the students are determined by the School’s General Assembly and are available at the School website. According to these criteria, students are eligible to participate if they have completed the 7th semester of studies and the total duration of their studies has not exceeded the 10th semester. The School’s criteria for selecting students to take up Internships through the NSRF are: 1) The total number of courses they have successfully passed, which is a key prerequisite for their preparedness to work since they are so close to graduating. 2) In cases where the total number of courses is the same for several students, their grade average is taken into account. 3) If the grade average is also the same for some students, the marks they earned in their compulsory courses (C) are taken into account. Those with the same scores and students next in line are included on a list of runners-up strictly in order of priority.

3. In the RPUS, the NSRF Internship is selected in addition to the 42 courses (5th to 10th semester); it is recorded in the student's transcripts and in the Diploma Supplement, but is not taken into account for the final diploma grade. It is only indicated whether the course was “pass” or “fail”.

Excavation

Participation in university excavations falls under the Department of Archaeology and aims to engage students in the work of excavations. It is open to students who are at least in their 5th semester of studies and who have completed the “Excavation–Archaeological Drawing” AAA 313 (OPUS) or ARCH 251 (RPUS) course. The criteria for evaluating students participating in excavations are: i) completion of at least 3 weeks of participation in the excavation; ii) Writing and submitting a written report to the university excavation supervisor – after completion of the excavation period – in relation to the object of the excavation (up to 2,000 words). The final evaluation of students during the excavation is based on both their contribution during the exploration and on their written report, and counts towards their grade in AAA 313/ARCH 251.

Erasmus Courses

1. Students who are planning to travel abroad as part of the European Erasmus Programme should register for incomplete courses from previous semesters, in accordance with provisions 3.4, 4.4 and 4.5 of this Regulation on registering for classes, provided that the codes listed in the final learning agreement with the foreign university do not coincide with the courses registered at the home institution. Course registration at AUTh is submitted in about the middle of the semester, after the deadline for amended learning agreements, to prevent a double examination for the same course code. The registration dates specifically for outgoing Erasmus students will be posted in the School Registrar’s announcements. 

2. The process for recognition of courses through the Erasmus programme is initiated by application of the student which is reviewed by the School’s or institution’s Erasmus Advisor (ECTS Coordinator) with input from the instructors within whose subject area the courses to be recognised fall. Courses from foreign universities which do not have equivalency with those of the School may be credited to the student as Free Options (FO) or listed on their Diploma Supplement.

Coursebooks/Textbooks

1. Students are entitled to select 1 textbook for each course and it is provided free of charge. The selection is made through the Eudoxus IT system which students can access with their AUTh account credentials.

2. The list of course textbooks for students in the School includes at least 1 recommended text per compulsory or optional course and is found on the list of textbooks on the Eudoxus Central IT system.

3. Applications for textbooks are submitted each semester on dates scheduled by the Eudoxus system. Students request textbooks for the courses included in their class registration for each semester.

4. Approved textbooks are available in printed form in sufficient copies in the School Library and are available to students who need them.

5. Students are not entitled to more textbooks than the number of courses required to complete their degree.

Recognition of Courses

1. Students admitted to the School of History and Archaeology may have courses recognised (Law 4115/2013, Article 35). Courses which the students have been taught and in which they have been examined successfully in their originating School are eligible for recognition.

2. In the event students are admitted to the School through the advanced qualifying exam system, the semester of their registration is determined by decision of the School’s General Assembly. The possibility of having courses recognised is contingent upon the student having earned a passing grade in all three courses included in the advanced qualifying exam system. Students must submit a written request for course recognition listing all courses for which recognition is desired. Such requests are reviewed by instructors in the comparable or related subject areas under which these courses may fall. Course recognition is approved by the School’s General Assembly.

Student Assessment

1. Courses for which students register for the first time at the start of the winter semester are examined during the January and September examinations periods of the same academic year. Courses for which students register at the start of the spring semester are examined during the June and September examination periods of the same academic year.

2. The manner in which student performance is assessed is determined by the instructor (Law 4009/2011 Article 33(9)) and includes written or oral examination or submission of a paper or project or a combination of the above with parallel use of new technologies and tools. Special arrangements are available for persons with disabilities. With regard to Compulsory courses (C) and Compulsory courses per module (CM), except Compulsory seminars per module (CMS), the optional completion of projects by the students does not exempt them from examination but is counted in their final grade. The submission of a project or paper in CMS courses is mandatory.

4. Course examinations are held exclusively within specified examination periods, in accordance with the timetable drawn up by the competent committee, appointed by the School’s General Assembly.

5. Exams, either written or oral, are held for all examinees only once during the examination period. To ensure impartiality, at least 2 students or instructors take part in oral examinations, with the option of another staff member of the School standing in for an instructor. The time allowed for written examination of each course is at least 2½ hours from the time the exam questions are read out and the instructor has answered any questions by the examinees. Examinees may not leave the exam room for the first 30 minutes from the time the questions are read out.

6. Students should arrive at the exam venue at the precise time stated on the Examination Timetable; delays will deprive them of the right to take part. Students should have with them their student IDs or Study Booklet or, in case of loss, any type of proof of identity (Decision 11508/14-6-1989, Meeting of the Senate 2562/7-6-1989).

7. The use of books or other aids or electronic means of communication is prohibited during examinations, unless the instructor uses a different form of examination (open book). In order to ensure the integrity of the examination process, in the event the above regulation is violated, the exam paper will be given a Zero mark. Written projects or papers submitted to a CMS or other course will also receive a Zero mark in the event of plagiarism.

8. Students are assessed according to a grading system of Zero (0) to Ten (10), with Five (5) being the minimum passing grade.

9. Exam results are announced by the instructor within 30 days of the date the exam was held. The results of oral examinations are not announced individually but cumulatively for all exam takers. Any hard copy posting of results includes, in addition to the course title, the student’s special registration number and grade, without listing the student’s name, in accordance with regulations governing the protection of personal data.

10. Every student is entitled to see their written exam and to request clarification on their assessment within 15 days from the time grades are announced and during their instructor’s office hours.

11. The entry of a student’s incorrect grade is rectified by the instructor following a written request to the School Registrar’s Office and approval by the School’s General Assembly. No other type of grade revision is possible.

12. Students failing a course more than 3 times may apply for approval by the School’s Assembly to be examined by a 3-member committee of School instructors from the same or related subject area who are appointed by the same Assembly (Law 4009/2011 Article 33(10)).  The instructor responsible for the examination is exempted from the committee. In the event of a failing grade, the student's ability to continue with studies is determined by the terms and conditions established by the AUTh Internal Regulation.

13. A failing grade in a compulsory core or compulsory module course does not mean the student must re-register to attend the course again. If it is an Optional (O) course or Free Option (FO) course, the student may choose to take another course in the same category.

14. Student grades are not transferable from one examination period to another.

Credit Accumulation and Graduation

1. Students must complete 240 ECTS credits (30 ECTS credits per semester) to complete their degree.

2. According to the decision by the AUTh Senate (meeting no. 2888/28-5-2014 and 2887/9-5-2014), the method of calculating the final grade of the degrees awarded by AUTh Schools has been adapted to the provisions of Ministerial Decision Φ5/89656/Β3/2007 (Government Gazette 1466/Β/2007) “Implementation of System for Transfer and Accumulation of Credits” and the degree grade ranking is added to the Diploma Supplement. This applies to students registering in 2020 onward under the RPUS.

As a result, to calculate the degree grade (Ministerial Decision Φ141/Β3/2166, GovGaz 308/B/ 18-6-1987), the grade received in each course (including for Internships only for students under the OPUS) is multiplied by a weighting factor for the course and the sum of each product is divided by the sum of the weighting factors for all courses (including Internships only for students under the OPUS). The course weighting factors are the same as the corresponding ECTS.

Grade for Course 1 x ECTS for Course 1 + Course Grade for Course 2 x ECTS for Course 2 + …

Total Number of Degree ECTS for a particular graduate

4. For students under all previous programmes of studies, the weighting factor is 1.

5. Students who have been graded in more courses (up to the 2 provided for) than the minimum required number of courses and ECTS to be awarded the degree may request that grades earned on Free Option (FO) courses or Optional (O) courses not be taken into account in calculating the degree grade. This applies only in the event that the number of courses and ECTS remaining are at least equal to the number required for the degree award, while also fulfilling the requirement for 30 ECTS per semester (Ministerial Decision Φ14.1/Β3/2166, GovGaz 308/18-6-1987).

6. The copy of the Degree is accompanied by the Diploma Supplement, which is an explanatory document describing the nature, level, context, content and status of the studies that were pursued and successfully completed by the graduate. It also provides grade distribution guidance, grade classification and the qualification classification.

Teaching Assessment and Evaluation by the Students

1. The process of conducting student evaluations of courses and instructors is well established and takes place within a specified time frame at the end of each semester. It is conducted online through the Quality Assurance Unit (MODIP) and the confidentiality and integrity of the online system is assured. The aim of the evaluation process is to improve the educational work provided by the School of History and Archaeology to its students. The process, in which students are asked to answer questions on an online questionnaire, is in the students’ interest. At the same time, it is the only way in which their views can be expressed, collectively and cumulatively, so that aside from corrective measures instructors may undertake as part of self-improvement efforts and improving their courses, additional measures may be taken where necessary. Graduating students are also asked to complete a questionnaire through MODIP for an overall assessment of their studies.

2. The School’s Internal Assessment Team is charged with making an annual presentation of the evaluation results from semester courses and an overall evaluation of the PUS to the School’s General Assembly. These reports are notified to students by posting them on the School’s website or in whatever manner is deemed appropriate.

Disciplinary Offences

With regard to disciplinary offences of any sort, the School applies the provisions of the old AUTh Internal Regulation, which will be adapted to those in the new AUTh Regulation still being drafted (2020).

IMPLEMENTATION AND REVISION OF THIS REGULATION

1. The violation of the provisions of this Regulation is subject to the provisions of AUTh’s regulations.

2. According to the provisions of current law, this Regulation can be supplemented, amended or revised by decision of the School’s General Assembly.

3. The provisions of this Regulation will be amended/adapted to the anticipated (2020) Internal Regulation of the AUTh and the specific provisions it sets out on matters related to undergraduate studies.